Universiteit Leiden

nl en

Onderzoek

TOP bijeenkomst - Onontgonnen data: oneindig veel mogelijkheden!

6 februari 2020

Een bekend probleem voor velen: projecten met nog onontgonnen data maar een gebrek aan tijd om daar wat mee te doen. Om ervoor te zorgen dat veel van die data toch hun weg naar publicatie vinden, deed het instituutsbestuur afgelopen zomer een oproep voorstellen in te dienen.

Aan die oproep werd massaal gehoor gegeven en het instituut kende een flink aantal subsidies toe. Nieuwe samenwerkingen werden opgezet en als uitkomst hiervan zijn diverse publicaties onderweg. Tijd om de balans op te maken en eens te horen waar onze collega’s aan gewerkt hebben.

Dinsdag 11 februari in de common room

Op dinsdag 11 februari staat de TOP bijeenkomst dan ook in het kader van deze 'ontgonnen data'-subsidies. In en om de common room zullen subsidiewinnaars hun werk presenteren. Collega’s kunnen onder het genot van een hapje en een drankje rondlopen en elkaar en elkaars werk leren kennen.

Planning en programma

  • 15:00 – 15:15 Walk in and welcome
  • 15:15 – 15:35 Round 1
  • 15:35 – 15:40 Changeover
  • 15:40 – 16:00 Round 2

Presentations round 1

Does Parental Autonomy Support Mediate the Relation Between Parent and Infant Executive Function? A Study of Mothers and Fathers in the Netherlands and China

Research suggests that Executive Function (EF) is transmitted across generations. Besides genetic inheritance, parental autonomy support has been proposed as a potential mechanism explaining the intergenerational contiguity of EF. Although there is considerable evidence supporting the relation between parental EF and child EF, between parental EF and autonomy support, and between autonomy support and child EF separately, few have investigated those associations among non-Western samples and fathers.

To begin to address these critical gaps, the current study investigated the role of maternal and paternal autonomy support in the relation between parental EF and infant EF at 14 months of age in the Netherlands and China.

Does stress cause negative attributions of child behavior?

We used data from the Naughty or Clumsy project to study whether stress has a causal effect on negative attributions of child behavior. Mothers of young children visited our lab twice to complete an attribution task. One visit was stressful, using an adapted version of the Trier Social Stress Test, and one visit was not stressful. We also study the role of physiological stress and risk of child maltreatment.

SmallTalk

With our project ‘SmallTalk’ we examined the quality and quantity of communication between caregiver and children and the reliability of the Language Environment Analyses (LENA) in childcare. The LENA was worn by the children and provided information on the quantity of communication between child and caretaker.

In the article we are writing we examine the relation between quality and quantity of environmental language and the language development of the children. In addition we would like to examine a possible moderating role of temperament. The first steps in writing the article will be presented; the output on quality and quantity of environmental language.

Two projects on achievement grouping.

1. What do students think about differentiation and within-class achievement grouping?

Questionnaires and interviews were used to investigate how students perceive differentiation and within-class homogeneous achievement grouping in primary mathematics education. Students generally preferred tasks and instruction that were adapted to their current achievement level. However, didactical and socioemotional disadvantages of placement in a low achievement group were also identified.

2. Relating achievement grouping to students’ motivation

In Dutch primary education, achievement grouping nowadays is common practice. However, its theoretical unpinning is rather weak and not so much is known about effects. We examined achievement grouping in its different shapes and related this to students’ motivation.

Presentations in Round 2

Testing the Effectiveness of Video-feedback Intervention to promote Positive Parenting and Sensitive Discipline (VIPP-FC) on Neurobiological Parameters

Wilma G. M. Wentholt, Nikita K. Schoemaker, Ralph C. A. Rippe, Femmie Juffer, Harriet J. Vermeer, & Lenneke R. A. Alink

The goal of the current study was to test the effectiveness of VIPP-FC on neurobiological parameters of foster parents and children in a randomized controlled trial. We expected that VIPP-FC would improve the stress regulation of foster parents and children, as indicated by salivary and hair cortisol concentrations.

Furthermore, we expected that VIPP-FC related to larger increases in levels of salivary oxytocin of foster parents and children. Multiple imputation was used to deal with missing data and multilevel analyses were pooled. None of the expected results were found. Possible explanations for the absence of an intervention effect are discussed.

Can immaturity be adaptive?

Dietsje Jolles & Linda van Leijenhorst

The ability to learn in a top-down, controlled manner greatly benefits from the maturation of the prefrontal cortex, and associated cognitive control abilities. However, it has been argued that other types of learning, e.g. experiential learning, may actually suffer from increased control. The aim of the present study was to characterize changes in the interaction between these two types of learning across development. 142 participants in three age groups: children (n = 28, ages 7-9 years), adolescents (n = 52, ages 10-12 years), and adults (n = 62, ages 17-36 years) performed a complex rule application task.

Unbeknownst to the participants, half of the trials contained a feature that predicted the correct response, which could be learned through feedback. Our findings suggest that younger children benefited most from the presence of a predictive cue, indicating that immature cognitive control may, in some cases, be adaptive.

It’s Mine! Sibling property disputes during early childhood

During early childhood siblings have on average 2-4 conflicts per hour (Lollis, Ross & Leroux, 1996; Ross, 1996), of which the majority stem from issues around personal possessions (McGuire et al., 2000, Raffaelli, 1992). Despite its frequent occurrence, insight into sibling property disputes comes from a hand full of studies (Martin & Ross, 2005) and evidence on which sibling characteristics may explain the large range in the occurrence of these conflicts—studies indicated that the number of property conflicts ranged from 0.7 to 5.3 an hour—is scant and inconsistent.

The current observational study investigates how several characteristics of the sibling dyad are related to the occurrence of property disputes between 2 and 4-year-old siblings in 380 families. More specifically we investigate how gender, birth order and age of both siblings is related to behaviors during sibling property disputes.

Teachers’ difficulty in using CBM data for decision-making: Are they failing or are we?

Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM) is an ongoing progress-monitoring system for teachers to use to evaluate the effects of instruction on the progress of students with learning difficulties. Teachers are supposed to use CBM graphed data to guide their instructional decision-making; however, teachers have difficulty with interpreting CBM graphs, extracting information from graphs, and linking the data to instruction. In this study, the extent to which teachers receive adequate training in reading and interpreting CBM graphed data, and in linking CBM data to instruction, is examined via a systematic review of CBM instructional materials.

Instructional materials including slides from presentations, trainings modules, and workshops, and training manuals and books. Materials were coded as to the extent that they focused on: (1) general information on CBM; (2) information on how to create, administer, and score CBM measures; (3) information on understanding and interpreting CBM data and linking the data to instruction; (4) other (for example, how to use an online CBM progress monitoring system). Analysis focused on the percentage of instructional material devoted to understanding, interpreting, and linking data relative to the other categories, and on whether the obtained percentages were different from what would be expected by chance, and from what would be recommended by CBM experts. Implications for teaching teachers to implement CBM data-based decision making are discussed.

Wei Li
Wei Li - Promovendus bij Opvoeding en Ontwikkeling

Subsidiewinnaar Wei Li over haar project

Een van de subsidiewinnaars is Wei Li. Met behulp van de subsidie heeft zij onderzocht of de relatie tussen executief functioneren van ouders en baby’s gemedieerd wordt door 'parental autonomy support'.

Wei Li over haar project: "Research suggests that Executive Function (EF) is transmitted across generations. Besides genetic inheritance, parental autonomy support has been proposed as a potential mechanism explaining the intergenerational contiguity of EF. Although there is considerable evidence supporting the relation between parental EF and child EF, between parental EF and autonomy support, and between autonomy support and child EF separately, few have investigated those associations among non-Western samples and fathers. To begin to address these critical gaps, the current study investigated the role of maternal and paternal autonomy support in the relation between parental EF and infant EF at 14 months of age in the Netherlands and China".

Benieuwd naar de bevindingen van Wei Li en die van andere subsidiewinnaars? Kom 11 februari van 15.00 tot 16.00 naar de TOP-bijeenkomst in en om de common room van Pedagogische Wetenschappen.

Deze website maakt gebruik van cookies.  Meer informatie.